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-Ribcage Rotation- Why it’s important and how it impacts your pelvic floor

✨Your ribcage is connected to your pelvic floor ✨

Our primary breathing muscle (diaphragm) works with our pelvic floor

How well our diaphragm works depends on how well our ribcage moves

How well our ribcage moves depends on how well it can rotate ?

Test this for yourself:

1⃣ Slump forward in your chair and now rotate right and left

2⃣ Sit up tall and arch your back, now rotate right and left

3⃣ Sit with your ribcage and pelvic stacked on top of each other, rotate right and left

Which position gave you the most rotation?

Bonus test: which position enabled you to take the biggest breath?

See where I’m going here? ?

Answer = 3⃣ for both

Limited rotation and/or asymmetrical ribcage rotation limits the effectiveness of our breath, which limits our pelvic floor. A less effective pelvic floor means a core system that’s not reaching its full potential [insert leaking ?issues here].

If we can’t breathe well, we can’t activate our core and pelvic floor well, which means we can’t transfer load well through the pelvis. Running requires us to load 2.5-4x our body weight with each running step. If we can’t do that well, we can’t run well.

Many of my mother runners struggle with ribcage rotation, and in turn their pelvic floor coordination. Pregnancy causes expansion of the ribcage + the lower portion to tip forward (test position #2 from above) to accommodate baby’s growth. In the third trimester, there is very little room for that diaphragm to move well because the baby is taking up allllll the available real estate. This results in Mama doing very shallow breathing and very little rotating. Postpartum, many Mamas are busy holding and nursing alllll day, which causes the lower portion of the ribcage to tip backward (test position #1 from above).

So how do we help our ribcage rotate well to help our breathing and pelvic floor?

?Practice stacking your ribcage over your pelvis (test position #3). Breathe 360deg around your ribcage as you inhale, and notice the 360deg circle melt back towards your spine as you exhale. Do this lying on the ground, on hands and knees, and in sitting for different feedback. Your ribcage to pelvis alignment should remain unchanged as you inhale/exhale. (see breathing video for reference)

?In sidelying: bend your knees and hips to 90deg, and stack both arms together at shoulder height on the floor with a pillow under your head. Inhale in this starting position, then exhale as you rotate your head, top arm and ribcage only towards the wall behind you. Inhale to return to your start position. Repeat 5-8x each side. (see windmill video for reference)

?In sitting: inhale 360deg to start, now rotate your head, arms, and ribcage as far as is comfortable to a side as you exhale. Think about your torso being a towel that’s full of water as you inhale, and your exhale + rotation is wringing out the water. Inhale to come back to your start position. Repeat 5-8x each side.

? As you explore these breathing exercises, think about breathing into the back of your ribcage and check in to see if you’re lifting your chest and shoulders vs 360deg expansion. Keep your shoulders and neck as relaxed as possible.

?Another helpful tool to improve ribcage movement is wrapping a towel or resistance band around the bottom of your ribcage to breathe into with your inhale, and gently recoil away from it as you exhale. This tactile feedback is often helpful in the beginning.

How’s your ribcage moving?

Did you notice a difference in yoru rotation right vs left?

Comment below which side is harder for you? ?

Left is my harder side!! ?

Questions/comments? Drop those below too!

IG post:

✨Your ribcage is connected to your pelvic floor ✨

.

Our primary breathing muscle (diaphragm) works with our pelvic floor

How well our diaphragm works depends on how well our ribcage moves

How well our ribcage moves depends on how well it can rotate ?

.

Test this for yourself:

1⃣ Slump forward in your chair and now rotate right/left

2⃣ Sit up tall and arch your back, now rotate right/left

3⃣ Sit with your ribcage and pelvic stacked on top of each other, rotate right/left

Which position gave you the most rotation?

Bonus test: which position enabled you to take the biggest breath?

Answer = 3⃣ for both

.

Limited rotation and/or asymmetrical ribcage rotation limits the effectiveness of our breath, which limits our pelvic floor. A less effective pelvic floor means a core system that’s not reaching its full potential [insert leaking ?issues here].

.

If we can’t breathe well,

We can’t activate our core and pelvic floor well,

Which means we can’t transfer load well through the pelvis.

Running requires us to load

2.5-4x our body weight with each running step.

If we can’t do that well,

We can’t run well.

.

So how do we help our ribcage rotate well to help our breathing and pelvic floor?

?Practice stacking your ribcage over your pelvis (test position #3). Breathe 360deg around your ribcage as you inhale, and notice the 360deg circle melt back towards your spine as you exhale. Do this lying on the ground, on hands and knees, and in sitting for different feedback.

?In sitting: inhale 360deg to start, now rotate your head, arms, and ribcage as far as is comfortable to a side as you exhale. Think about your torso being a towel that’s full of water as you inhale, and your exhale + rotation is wringing out the water. Inhale to come back to your start position. Repeat 5-8x each side.

?Another tool to improve ribcage movement is wrapping a towel or resistance band around the bottom of your ribcage to breathe into with your inhale, and gently recoil away from it as you exhale. This tactile feedback is often helpful in the beginning.

.

How’s your ribcage moving?

Comment below which side is harder for you? ?

Left is my harder side!! ?